Teaching tip: scatter matrix plots help students see the big picture

I recently went through a draft student project. While their literature review and understanding of pairwise relationships was great, the presentation of a complex literature and set of predictions wasn’t as clear as it could be. The apparent complexity or volume of things to talk about perhaps obscured the simple solution that (as a fresh pair […]

Bayesian analysis toolbox for delay discounting, version 1.3

Posterior predictive checks The toolbox now calculates 2 measures of “goodness of fit” of the models. This is a useful quantitative reassurance that the models describe the participant discounting behaviour better than chance. In turn, this is important when we come to deciding which (if any) data files we should exclude. You can go and […]

Bayesian analysis toolbox for delay discounting, version 1.2

I’ve just released Version 1.2 of the toolbox ‘Bayesian analysis toolbox for delay discounting.’ The main feature of this release was the addition of new models. For example, you can now estimate discount rates (ignoring the magnitude effect). So you can obtain estimates of the discount rate k, which is very useful if your primary […]

Hierarchical Bayesian estimation and hypothesis testing for delay discounting tasks

I am happy to announce my 3rd paper of the year, accepted for publication in Behavior Research Methods. Following my initial foray into writing review papers (2 earlier this year), this is my first methods paper, and also my first contribution to higher-level decision making.

It is Time to Stop Teaching Frequentism to Non-statisticians

Great stuff, from William M. Briggs […] there are lot of folks out there who, because they once had a graduate survey course in regression, and have personally produced a p-value or two, feel they are versed sufficiently in probability to pass on their skills to fresh students. But their rendering of the subtleties of […]

Using mixture modelling to distinguish between low- and high-level factors in natural image viewing

Abstract The allocation of overt visual attention while viewing photographs of natural scenes is commonly thought to involve both bottom-up feature cues, such as luminance contrast, and top-down factors such as behavioural relevance and scene under- standing. Profiting from the fact that light sources are highly visible but uninformative in visual scenes, we develop a […]