Hierarchical Bayesian estimation and hypothesis testing for delay discounting tasks

I am happy to announce my 3rd paper of the year, accepted for publication in Behavior Research Methods. Following my initial foray into writing review papers (2 earlier this year), this is my first methods paper, and also my first contribution to higher-level decision making.

Bayesian accounts of covert selective attention: a tutorial review

I am very happy to announce my new tutorial review paper. Vincent, B. T. (2015) Bayesian accounts of covert selective attention: a tutorial review, Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, 77(4), 1013-1032. If you do not have an institutional subscription to Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, Springer allow me to self-archive my author-accepted manuscript (legal). Get the preprints here: [manuscript pdf], [supplementary pdf]. The final publication […]

How do we use the past to predict the future in oculomotor search?

When we conduct visual search for an item of interest we can not only ask ‘what looks like my target’ but we can also ask ‘where do I expect the target to be?’ In a forthcoming paper in the journal Vision Research I asked: how do we use our past experience to construct predictions of where a […]

Combining prior beliefs and sensory evidence

If we want to try to locate a target of interest given a brief glimpse of a visual scene, then we can use at least two sources of information. Firstly, we can use any visual cues which give away the target’s location. However, in many cases the visual cues are insufficient to work out precisely […]

Parallel processing of uncertain sensory information account for search asymmetry effects

The yes/no detection task is a classic method used to probe the inner workings of how humans process information. In this paper I was interested in one quite specific experimental phenomenon of visual information processing: that of search asymmetries. If you search for an item A amongst distracters B, then you will have some level […]

The prominence of behavioural biases in eye guidance

Abstract When attempting to understand where people look during scene perception, researchers typically focus on the relative contributions of low- and high-level cues. Computational models of the contribution of low-level features to fixation selection, with modifications to incorporate top-down sources of information have been abundant in recent research. However, we are still some way from […]

Using mixture modelling to distinguish between low- and high-level factors in natural image viewing

Abstract The allocation of overt visual attention while viewing photographs of natural scenes is commonly thought to involve both bottom-up feature cues, such as luminance contrast, and top-down factors such as behavioural relevance and scene under- standing. Profiting from the fact that light sources are highly visible but uninformative in visual scenes, we develop a […]

Optimal feature integration in visual search

One of the broad aims of my work is to apply the approach of Bayesian Decision Theory to attentional phenomena. In this particular paper, published back in 2009, I examined one specific aspect of the approach: the decision rule. Described very succinctly Bayesian Decision Theory consists of two main steps. Firstly, we make an inference about […]

Systematic tendencies in scene viewing

Abstract While many current models of scene perception debate the relative roles of low- and high- level factors in eye guidance, systematic tendencies in how the eyes move may be infor- mative. We consider how each saccade and fixation is influenced by that which preceded or followed it, during free inspection of images of natural […]

Investigating a space-variant weighted salience account of visual selection

Abstract Weighted salience models are a popular framework for image-driven visual attentional processes. These models operate by: sampling the visual environment; calculating feature maps; combining them in a weighted sum and using this to determine where the eye will fixate next. We examine these stages in turn. We find that a biologically plausible non-uniform retinal […]

Is the early visual system optimised to be energy efficient?

Abstract This paper demonstrates that a representation which balances natural image encoding with metabolic energy efficiency shows many similarities to the neural organisation observed in the early visual system. A simple linear model was constructed that learned receptive fields by optimally balancing information coding with metabolic expense for an entire visual field in a 2-stage […]

Synaptic energy efficiency in retinal processing

Abstract Recent work suggests that the visual system may represent early visual information in an energy efficient manner [Nature 381 (1996); Nature, 381 (1996) 607; Neural Comput. 3 (2001) 799; Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. 11 (2001) 475]. This paper applies the idea of energy efficient representations to understand retinal processing, and provides evidence that centre surround […]